I’m a big fan of David Burns who is a certified master beekeeper and runs Long Lane Honeybee Farms and the nice online store www.honeybeesonline.com. He also has a really good YouTube channel where he posts all kinds of beekeeping videos, one of which struck me as odd. In this video post, he suggest roughing up the inside of your boxes to mimic┬áthe texture the bees would normally find in the wild inside trees and other potential places they may call home. The idea is that they will cover the inside walls more vigorously with propolis which helps act as an extension of their immune system. Clearly science and beekeeping have come a long way on the subject of propolis and there does appear to be some good science around the subject and it’s not like it will hurt anything. Since I have the two new hive boxes built and ready for spring, I figured I’d experiment and rough up the insides of one and see what the differences would be between the two with one roughed up and the other not. I’ll come back and update this post with my findings in a few months.

Below I’ve got some before and after shots of the inside walls of one of the supers I’ve roughed up. David Burns says he as some sort of proprietary tool which he uses for the purpose of roughing up the interior walls of the boxes, unlike David, I’ll share my super secret tool, it’s a 5″ hole saw from lowes, but honestly, you should just use whatever tools you have laying around.

Inside wall before getting roughed up.

Inside wall before getting roughed up.

Inside wall after being roughed up with a hole saw.

Inside wall after being roughed up with a hole saw.

My "open source" non-proprietary hive roughing up tool. I'm looking at you David Burns.

My “open source” non-proprietary hive roughing up tool. I’m looking at you David Burns.